All Assembly Required

or: The Anarchist’s Office Suite, Phase 2

The staked desk was the first of three pieces for my office, and by the summer I will hopefully have completed the remaining two projects – a boarded book case and a staked chair, both from the Anarchist’s Design Book, and both in maple to match the desk.

Because my workshop is unheated, I tend to tee up projects a couple of months in advance of when I plan to start them – breaking stock down to rough dimension and then stickering it in the house to acclimatise until I’m ready to get building. Before I can work on the book case , I am writing (and building) a project article for Popular Woodworking, scheduled for the October issue later this year. But in the meantime, and before I started working on the piece for PopWood, I took some time to prepare the stock for the bookcase and chair.

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Breaking maple boards down with the Skelton Panel Saw

When marking rough timber to length I prefer a timber framer’s square, and a chunky carpenter’s pencil (my saw *ahem* addiction means that I have a healthy supply of the carpenter’s pencils Bad Axe include with each saw), while rip cuts are easily marked out with a chalk line. Although this is not tricky work, I tend to take it quite slowly so that I can look over the boards carefully and make cuts to avoid knots or other defects. Once the boards have been marked out, and triple checked that the lengths are correct (including an extra inch or so to allow for any end checking that may occur), onto the saw benches they go to be broken down. Sawing the stock is straight forward – my Disston D8 handles rip cuts while the Skelton Panel Saw cross cuts stock to length.

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Stock preparation tools – Skelton Panel Saw, timber framer’s square, and carpenter’s pencil

After breaking the boards down I left them in the workshop for a week or so before stickering them in the house. I find that this staged process of cutting to rough length and width, resting in the ‘shop, and then moving into a heated environment avoids shocking timber and so reduces drying related movement or checking. Once I’ve finished the project article for PopWood, it will be onto the book case, which will provide a home for the remainder of my books and research materials currently languishing in boxes on the floor. And finally, the chair. Slowly but surely, the office suite is coming together!

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In this pile of maple is a boarded bookcase, just waiting to be assembled.

Staked Work Table – in situ, in pictures

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A vintage compass (from 1904) sits on the corner of my desk. The lif of the compass is engraved with “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost.

As soon as a project is finished and installed, most of my attention tends to switch to the next build on my work bench. The staked desk is a little different, in that I’ve been sitting at it most evenings this week catching up on various items of work. And it has been wonderful to spend some quality time working at the desk – I’m sure this is a piece of furniture that will age well as I spent many hours, and years, working at it.

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A confluence of components – the top, batten, and leg all coming together.

One of my favourite post-completion stages is always taking detail shots of the completed piece. Gareth is booked for a photo session in April, so there will be new additions to the Portfolio section of OtW in the near future. But in the meantime here are some detail shots I took of the desk in situ.

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The finish on the top worked very well. Plenty of protection, and the figure is emphasised without becoming distracting.

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Maker’s mark on the left hand batten.

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Facets!

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More facets. This time one of the back legs.

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Left hand batten.

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This is my favourite detail – the leg tenon entering the batten. Just a little hint of the, compound angles, and lovely facets. I could look at this element of the desk all day.