Roubo is Coming… Part 12

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With the legs assembled I could check the final width of the slab

The slab is now processed on five of its six surfaces, with only the top left to flatten (which will wait until the bench has been assembled). The final surface to be cleaned up in this stage of the build was the rear edge of the slab, and this the one area where my approach to the build has created a little extra work. In his book, Chris recommends processing the slab first, so that the stretchers are cut to suit the final size of the slab. However, because I decided to limber up for this build by preparing the undercarriage first, I had to size the slab to suit the stretchers. To be honest, this was not too much extra work, and given the time it has taken to get this far into the build, I’m glad I didn’t work on the slab when I first started, as it would likely have moved again in the intervening months.

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Direct measurement from components reduces the risk of error

The rear edge does not need to be square, or super flat, but it does need to be of the same width as the legs and short stretchers. Whenever possible, I prefer to avoid measuring, and so to test how close the slab was to final width, I assembled the legs and short stretchers, and placed them in position on the slab. I’ll admit that this was also for my own curiosity and to get a sense of the scale of the bench. With the legs in situ, I could see that the slab was 11/16″ too wide – not a huge amount in the grand scheme of things, but more than I could want to remove with a jack plane from a 6″ thick, 102″ long slab or pretty truculent oak. Instead, I decided to rip the waste off with my 119 year old Disston D8 handsaw.

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Ripping the slab to width. Yes this felt like work, but with patience it is possible to accurately cut 6″ thick oak by hand.

To provide a line to cut to, I set my panel gauge to the width of a pair of legs (still no measuring), and struck a line down the slab. When cutting 6″ thick timber, the key is to go slow and steady, and to keep the saw plate lubricated with plenty of mutton tallow. I used an overhand ripping grip for most of this work, alternating occasionally to lay down a guide kerf by sawing at a shallow angle to the top of the workpiece.

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The waste has been ripped off

Once I had ripped the waste off, I rotated the slab (with assistance from my ever-helpful slab moving team) so that the freshly cut edge was facing up, and the slab was resting on the saw benches (in the same position as when I worked the front edge). The rear edge is not bang on perpendicular to the underside of the slab, nor is it dead nuts straight. But it is within perfectly acceptable tolerances for this surface. I spent a few minutes cleaning up the area where the rear legs are situated with a jack plane, so that these are perpendicular to the underside, as this will make for an easier layout when cutting the leg joinery (the next stage of the build).

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Tuning the area where the leg joinery will be cut

The slab is now ready for the leg joinery to be cut, which means that we will be moving it back into storage while I cut the double tenon on the legs. The build is continuing to progress smoothly, and I am aiming to assemble the bench shortly after I get back from teaching at the Lost Art Press storefront in September.

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The slab is processed on all surfaces save for the top, which will happen once the bench is assembled.

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