Roubo Is Coming… Part 11

So far every step of the Roubo build has been spent on processes which directly contribute to the structural integrity of the bench, or which affect its usability. And it has all been great fun. Sometimes though it is nice to do some work that has no bearing on how a project functions, and is purely about decoration. So, while the slab was in the right position, and the weather made for a nice evening in the ‘shop, this week I inlayed the plaque that Jenny Bower engraved for the bench. This was really enjoyable work – most of my inlay experience is for irregular, and much smaller, shaped pieces for guitar inlay. The large and regular sized of the plaque was a nice change of scale, although the processes are very much the same.

When I originally commissioned Jenny to engrave the plaque, my intention was to inlay it in the vise chop, where it would be prominently displayed. While that is still a good location, it did occur to me that the vise chop could conceivably be separated to the bench in decades time. So I decided instead to inlay the plaque to the face edge of the slab top, to the left hand end of the bench where it would be seen every time I entered the shop.

Having determined the final location, I placed the plaque on the slab and traced round it with a marking knife, using several passes and light pressure to cut a clean line without pushing the plaque out of position. Crisp inlay requires a clean edge to the recess, and I like to deepen my layout lines with a wide chisel (in this instance a 2″ butt chisel) and a sharp rap from a mallet. I then pared a shallow tough into the layout line, using the same chisel, and working from the waste side outwards. This is similar to preparing a “first class cut” for joinery, and helps to prevent any cutting tools straying over the edge of the inlay recess.

With the edge of the recess cleanly established, excavating the recess was easily done with a large router plane, working down the depth incrementally until the plaque was sitting just a hair below the surface. The corners of the recess were a little tight for the large router plane to reach, but a No271 router plane with a spear-tip blade reached into those with little trouble (collecting the unusual blades for this tool does occasionally pay off, even if 95% of the work is with the standard square tip blade!).

A test fit of the plaque showed that it pressed into place nicely. The brass, and Jenny’s outstanding engraving work adds a touch of personalisation and class to this monolithic bench. The workbench should outlast me (and in all likelihood the Apprentice’s grandchildren), and so knowing that my logo will be carried into the future in this way is very humbling.

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